• Important Election Dates
  • November 4, 2014 Statewide Election| Spanish

    Upcoming Holidays
  • September 1, 2014 – Labor Day. The Registrar of Voters office will be closed.


  • Notices and Press Releases

     

     

    The latest communications issued by the Registrar of Voters More…


twitter     Facebook    




Top-Two Open Primary

What Does This Mean For The Voter?



More information on Top Two

It changes the way candidates are elected in a primary election.

On June 8, 2010, California voters approved Proposition 14, which created the "Top-Two Open Primary Act".

There are 3 types of candidate contests

1) Party-Nominated (Formerly known as Partisan) Party-Nominated offices are contests in which the nominee is selected by the political party. Who can vote: Only voters registered with the same party preference as the candidate (except parties who allow non-partisans to cross-over and join their primary). Offices of: U.S. President and County Central Committees. Who advances to the general: Presidential contest only, the top vote getters in each party.

2) Voter-Nominated Voter-Nominated offices are contests in which the nominee is selected by the voter. It also allows candidates to choose whether they want to disclose their party preference on the ballot. Who can vote: All voters, regardless of party preference can vote for any candidate. This replaces party ballots in primary elections with a single combined ballot listing all candidates. Offices of: Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, State Controller, State Insurance Commissioner, State Board of Equalization, Attorney General, State Senator, State Assembly, US Senator, and US Representative. Who advances to the general election: The top-two vote-getters, regardless of party preference.

3) Non-Partisan A Non-Partisan office is an office in which no political party nominates a candidate. Judicial, school, county and municipal offices are examples of non-partisan offices. Who can vote: All voters, regardless of party preference. Offices of: Superintendent of Public Instruction, Superior Court Judges, County Offices, Municipal Offices, Schools and Special Districts. Who advances to the general: In majority vote contests, candidates that receive a majority of the votes win outright in the Primary. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, then the top-two vote-getters move on to the general election.

Primaria de los Dos Primeros

¿QUÉ SIGNIF ICA ESTO PARA EL VOTANTE?


Cambia la manera en que se eligen candidatos en una elección primaria.

El 8 de junio de 2010, los votantes de California aprobaron la Propuesta 14, creando la "Ley de Primarias Abiertas de los Dos Primeros".

Hay 3 tipos de contiendas de candidatos

1) Candidatos nominados por el partido (llamados antes candidatos partidarios) Los cargos nominados por el partido son contiendas en que el nominado es seleccionado por el partido político. Quién puede votar: Sólo los votantes afiliados al mismo partido que el candidato (menos los partidos que permiten que los votantes no afiliados participen en sus primarias). Cargos de: Presidente de los EE. UU. y Comités Centrales de los condados. Quién avanza a la elección general: Sólo para la contienda presidencial, los candidatos que obtienen el mayor número de votos en cada partido.


2) Candidatos nominados por el votante Los cargos nominados por el votante son contiendas en que el candidato nominado es seleccionado por los votantes. También permite a los candidatos divulgar o no su preferencia partidaria en la boleta. Quién puede votar: Todos los votantes, independientemente de su preferencia partidaria, pueden votar por cualquier candidato. Esto reemplaza las boletas partidarias en las elecciones primarias con una sola boleta combinada que tiene a todos los candidatos. Cargos de: Gobernador, Vicegobernador, Secretario de Estado, Tesorero Estatal, Contralor del Estado, Comisionado de Seguros del Estado, Directiva Estatal de Impuestos sobre Ventas, Usos y Otros, Procurador General, Senador Estatal, Asambleísta Estatal, Senador de los EE. UU. y Representante de los EE. UU. Quién avanza a la elección general: Los dos candidatos que obtienen el mayor número de votos, independientemente de su preferencia partidaria.


3) Cargos no partidarios Un cargo no partidario es aquél en que los partidos políticos no nominan a un candidato. Los cargos judiciales, escolares, de condado y municipales son ejemplos de cargos no partidarios. Quién puede votar: Todos los votantes, independientemente de su preferencia partidaria. Cargos de: Superintendente de Instrucción Pública, jueces de la corte superior, cargos de condado, oficinas municipales, escolares y distritos especiales. Quién avanza a la elección general: En las contiendas por mayoría, los candidatos que reciben la mayoría de votos ganan las elecciones primarias. Si ningún candidato recibe la mayoría de los votos, los dos candidatos con el mayor número de votos pasan a la elección general.